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20100919
20100919
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
tunnel and detour road that will bring everybody who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and the
the busy times for the beer business. so we had to work. so at 10 he had us in the warehouse sweeping the floors. the job -- we did every job there was to do. >> larry: gavin, was he tough on you? >> absolutely. well, my father used to say, i'm not going to leave you anything. you're going to have to work for it. if you don't work for it, i'll leave it all to charity. so we did. >> larry: a good idea, gavin. >> a good idea. but when you're 10, 11 years old, do you want to work on a saturday, holidays? probably not. but looking back it was probably the best thing that ever happened to us. >> larry: did he have a tendency, adrienne, to spoil you, being the only girl? >> of course. i can answer that. yes, he did. but also i admire he was ahead of his time as well. he wanted me to be independent, wanted me to go out and learn the things that my brothers were learning. so i admire him for his tenacity, that's right. and able to let me be myself. >> larry: but he always, george, kept a strong hand? >> pretty much. my mother took over when he didn't. so my mother's done a great job as well.
, and has had a huge influence on all of us. and part of that work ethic comes from our mother, she's great. >> larry: how old were you when your dad died. >> i was 13. >> larry: how old was he. >> he was 57. >> larry: that's pretty young. what did he die of. >> he was diabetic, a little overweight, didn't exercise as much as he should. >> larry: what's the background of the name maloof? >> it's lebanese. >> larry: how did this all start? first you all went into the liquor and beer business automatically, right? >> yes. >> larry: are you still in that, joe. >> we're not out of the beer business all together, we have a new project that we're working on called black star beer. >> larry: beer? >> yeah, a new beer that we're marketing it for a gentleman named minot westinger. but the other beer part of it we're out of distributorship. >> larry: what was your first business beyond alcohol? >> the general store, 100 years ago, my grandfather opened up a general store in las vegas, new mexico. and we say that's the real las vegas. and it had a general store and sold everything from sugar to lard t
. >>> cal grad sarah shoark back in the u.s. after more than a year in iranian prison. what she plans to do the moment she reaches new york. >> mostly i will miss your laughter. >> a mothers anguish over the loss of daughter. how friends and family remembered one of the young victims of the san bruno pipe explosion. >>> san bruno, the first toll lane that doesn't cross a bridge. >>> 7:30 a.m. the 19th of september. good morning i am julie watts. >> i am phil matier. we have a lot of news and talk to cover in the next hour. we are in the final month before the november elections and across the board. there is no clear front runners. we will talk about what both parties are going to need to do if they want to win this election. >>> plus later in the wake ofanti muslim sentiment a chance to show a different side. >>> and how health leaders in one bay area county are fighting back against an outbreak of whooping cough. >>> we will get to that in just a moment first leading the news this morning friends and family bid a fond farewell to one of the youngest victims of the san bruno pipeline explo
a suicide pact. investigators are searching for their vehicles that they might be using and they have children ranging from ages of 3 to 17 and will be right back as kron4 news weekend continues. a live look out side right now, the skies, the conditions in a few rainshowers of their right now. conditions in a few rainshowers of their right now. (music) r just broke! which is really exciting... except i'm at a grocery store. i was just standing here with a carton of oj, and all of a sudden, it was all over the floor. the water, not the oj. and i'm not near my doctor and i'm not really sure what i should do... [ intercom ] clean up on aisle three! [ inhales deeply ] ugh. [ male announcer ] when the unexpected happens, you need a health plan you can trust. 3.4 million californians trust us with their health coverage needs. but what were the results? fact: brown promised to improve schools. but the drop out rate increased 50%, and the state had to take over the schools. fact: the city controller found employees paid for 22,000 hours... they never worked. fact: brown promised to cut crime.
shourd returns to the u.s. this morning with plans to speak publicly about her ordeal. and federal investigators determine that pg&e was running the san bruno gas pipeline at pressure higher than the maximum allowed. good morning, everyone. thanks for joining us. i'm carolyn tyler. we're going to start off going to lisa argen, our weather a bit unusual. what else is new. we're going to talk about a chance of rain today, lisa. >> carolyn, that's right. rain in the north by where you'll need the wipers. here's a look at sonoma up through windsor. you can see a few light showers but mainly a lot of this rain is falling below the radar beam. not all is being picked up. it's light out there but we'll continue to see the spread south over here through napa. it continues to limp along through the bay area through the next couple of hours. but, you know, the rest of the sunday not looking too bad. i'll have the forecast later. >> a 20-year-old woman killed in the explosion and fire in san bruno will be laid to rest tomorrow. a memorial service was held yesterday. abc 7's amy hollyfield rep
of seven people killed in that fire. mike mibach joins us now live from sanbruno. mike? >> reporter: heather, there were stories about jessica's smile, there were stories about her laughter. and then there was a story that described the bond between her and the woman who brought her into this world. ♪ how sweet the sound ♪ >> reporter: tonight a celebration of life, the life of young jessica morales. the 20-year-old's family and closest of friends guided her into the church in the highlands where on this summer weekend she was remembered for her openness, gracefulness and her love for life and friends. >> she was my best friend, my sister, my partner in crime and my ray of sunshine. she shook my quiet little world with laughter, smiles, tears and most importantly, love. >> on behalf of the family, i would like to welcome you. >> reporter: jessica morles memorial was attended as by hundreds of people. her casket dressed in showers, different shades of purple, her favorite color. her teenage years were filled with passion and design. as she grew into a young woman, as one friend
if they can find a job, and save that space for hardnd criminals that put us at risk. we cannot afford to how's these people. i mean, actually some of them live better than our poor. so i hope this is a turn and i hope other states will take this on. and i really love c-span. it's so important these days. thank you so much. host: thanks for the phone call. we'll keep talking about this. but first, we want to get a quick update about the afghanistan elections. joining us on the phone is paul tate, with reuters and the afghanistan bureau chief. mr. tate, if you could tell us about the headlines that we're seing in this morning. here's one of them. afghan vote marred by irregularities. guest: good morning. it's certainly true there have been thousands of irregularities, we're told, even before voting began. thousands of voter registration cards, ink that was meant to identify people as having voted could be washed off. we even found some kids with bottles of bleach standing outside polling stations showing voters how to wash the ink off. the counting will take a very, very long time. so we're no
-like group. kristen welker joins from us los angeles. >> authorities say five adults and eight children are missing. the kids range in age from 3 to 17 years old. officials believe they may be immigrants from el salvador. they are in palmdale, an hour north of los angeles. family members reported the people missing saturday afternoon and expressed concern because they found personal belongings in a purse that one of the cult members left behind. >> they left behind notes saying they were going to visit their deceased relatives and meet jesus. notes that indicated that they wanted to go to the next life. no words such as suicide or taking our own life were used at all. but the indications seem that that may be a possibility. >> authorities also found cell no one's that purse. authorities have released a picture, this picture of the woman they believe is the leader of the group. her name is reyna chicas. >> have authorities said whether this group exhibited any signs of this in the past? >> it's reported six months ago they were heading to a rocky outdoors area to wait for an earthquake o
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
more than 50 years ago. >>> few of us can imagine what the injured san bruno victims and their families are going through, but one bay area woman knows all too well. she was also badly burned when a piece of pg&e equipment exploded. her story of recovery is inspirational. you would never know by looking at lisa nash what happened to her five years ago. >> i had to learn how to walk again. i had to learn how to use my hands. >> if anyone understands what the san bruno victims are facing it's lisa nash. it was august 2005. she was walking to work in san francisco's financial district. there was an explosion in an underground pg&e vault. the force lifted a manhole cover rocked buildings blocks away and sent nash to st. francis memorial hospital which has a renowned burn unit. >> it was not just the burns. it was my lungs had been affected, my skin. i was vulnerable to all sorts of infection. >> she was heavily sedated for two weeks and there were skin grafts, something likely for the san bruno victims
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)